news  2 0 1 1

Insulin Pumps in Scotland

Scotland is lagging behind the rest of Europe in its provision of insulin pumps to treat diabetes, a Conservative MSP has said Scotland is lagging behind the rest of Europe in its provision of insulin pumps to treat diabetes, a Conservative MSP has said.

Margaret Mitchell said health boards needed to provide more insulin pump therapy, which gives Type 1 diabetes patients more flexibility and can reduce the risks and complications associated with the disease.



Figures from the Scottish Diabetes Survey 2010 show only 2.5% of Type 1 patients in Scotland use insulin pumps, compared with 15% across Europe.

Scottish Government statistics show health boards are making progress in making the treatment available to more people.

Figures show NHS Ayrshire and Arran has increased its spending in this area from £31,872 in 2010/11 to £71,712 in 2011/12.

Meanwhile, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde increased the number of pediatric patients using pump therapy from 21 in 2010/11 to 38 in 2011/12, and NHS Borders met its target of having 37 patients in total on insulin pump therapy.

Ms Mitchell said: "It is great to see that insulin pump therapy is growing and becoming more mainstream in Scotland and that the majority of Scotland's health boards are on track with their planned investment in insulin pumps."

A Scottish Government spokesperson said: "We are committed to ensuring that people with diabetes get access to the best possible care. Our Diabetes Action Plan, published last year, set out a three-year vision for improving services offered to those living with diabetes in Scotland.

"We're encouraged to see that provision of insulin pump therapy is shown to have increased. However, we recognise there is much more work to do and will continue to encourage NHS boards to increase the availability of pumps, ensure more equitable provision and build on the improvements already made in diabetes care through the implementation of our Diabetes Action Plan.

"In addition, we recognise that structured education is a key ingredient of successful self-management and have offered direct funding to NHS boards to support structured education services."
Source: Press Association, August 2011
back to news 2011